Menu
School Logo
Language
Search

Curriculum Intent

Rationale

The curriculum is the planned activities that are organised in order to promote all aspects of learning, including personal growth, well-being and development. We aim to teach children how to grow into positive, responsible people, who can work and co-operate with others whilst developing knowledge and skills, so that they achieve their true potential and be happy and fulfilled in themselves.

 

Aims and Values

 

Learning, well-being and achievement drive everything we do at the Opossum Federation. Our role, in partnership with parents, is to build the foundations for a successful education, to enable each child to discover the joy of learning, to help them fulfil every aspect of their potential and to encourage their growth into ambitious and effective citizens, ready to play their part in their community and the world.

 

We want all our children to experience success and enjoy their learning when at school. We aim to achieve this through high expectations and high quality teaching within a structured and caring environment. Our curriculum, founded on the National Curriculum, has been designed to ensure relevance to our community of learners – building on their experience and broadening their horizons – beyond their personal experience. Programmes of study enable the development of knowledge and skills and understanding within individual subject disciplines whilst promoting learning links, connection and creativity, wherever possible. Children are encouraged to learn through enquiry and curiosity, drawing on real-life experiences to develop their skills as well as their knowledge.

 

At Opossum we view learning as a journey, each year building upon the skills and knowledge developed previously. We understand that, for pupils to be fully engaged with all aspects of the curriculum,  a secure knowledge of the key skills for English and mathematics is vital. Therefore, all aspects of our curriculum ensure that opportunities are provided for pupils to consolidate and further enhance these skills.

 

By the end of their time at an Opossum school, we intend that all our pupils are emotionally literate and have the confidence, resilience and increasing maturity to deal with changes in their lives and community.

We expect them to have developed:

  • A love of reading
  • An enquiring mind; ask questions and find out
  • Positive relationships and connection with others
  • Resilience and the ability to manage challenge and change
  • Ambition
  • Excellent behaviour which is founded on respect
  • An ability to problem solve – both within and outside of the classroom
  • Secure key maths and Literacy skills for their current stage, which will prepare them for their next phase of education
  • A love of life and learning

 

We fulfil our aims and objectives through:

  • The promotion of living a healthy lifestyle. Schools within the federation hold Healthy Schools London awards, participate in Change4Life and sporting competitions.
  • Promoting a Rights’ Respecting ethos. Schools within the federation hold UNICEF Right’ Respecting accreditations
  • A broad and rich curriculum developed around individual disciplines
  • Developing pupil leadership responsibilities such as Class Ambassadors /Pupil Parliament, Lunch Leaders, Sports Ambassadors and Prefects
  • Specific projects and activities such as: Artists in Residence photography workshops, sporting competitions and performing arts accreditations which deepen pupils’ knowledge and understanding in cross curricular programmes (currently limited due to COVID restrictions)
  • For more information on the National Curriculum, please follow the link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/425601/PRIMARY_national_curriculum.pdf

 

Our Intention:

Through the curriculum, we intend our pupils to

We do this through:

Be positive, responsible people

  • The use of a positive behaviour system
  • Embedding the UNCRC rights of the child
  • Learning and understanding of different religions and cultures

Work and co-operate together

  • Collaborative projects
  • Learning partners
  • Group work
  • Playground activities

Develop knowledge and skills

  • Sequential curriculum which builds upon previous knowledge and skills
  • Opportunities to apply knowledge and skills
  • Purposeful learning tasks
  • Opportunities to showcase and articulate their learning

Be effective citizens

  • The use of a positive behaviour system
  • Embedding he UNCRC rights of the child
  • Pupil leadership opportunities
  • Pupil Parliament
  • Opportunities to learn about local and global issues and events
  • Learning and understanding of different religions and cultures
  • Promotion of British and Opossum Values

Experience success and enjoy their learning

  • Feedback policy- opportunities to highlight success
  • Positive behaviour policy
  • Awards, such as: Platinum Pride/ Attendance/ Mathlete & Reader of the week/ Golden Assemblies/ Word Millionaires
  • At least ‘expected’ progress and attainment
  • Curriculum focus weeks e.g Shakespeare week

Build on their experience

  • Sequential curriculum which builds upon previous knowledge and skills
  • Make connections with learning through connector maps

Broaden their horizons, beyond their personal experience

  • Educational Visits 
  • Arts based projects and exhibitions
  • At least ‘expected’ progress and attainment
  • Syllabus which includes topics beyond their typical experience

Make learning links, identify connection and demonstrate creativity

  • Sequential curriculum which builds upon previous knowledge and skills
  • Make connections with learning through connector maps
  • Explicit highlighting of connections to prior learning.
  • Use of ‘floor books’ to establish prior knowledge and connections with previous learning

Be inquisitive and curious

  • Encouraging questions
  • Topics which make children ask questions
  • Spring writing project
  • Use of ‘floor book’ device to establish pupil interest/possible lines of enquiry

Have secure knowledge of the key skills for English and Mathematics for their stage of learning

  • Sequential curriculum which builds upon previous knowledge and skills
  • Inter-disciplinary links
  • Journal/ Dictation/ Grammar focus/ Arithmetic sessions
  • Use of high level texts

 

Curriculum Design:

Curriculum ‘defines the purposes of a school and the journey a school wants its pupils to take’ (Knowledge and the Future School; Young and Lambert, 2019). At the Opossum Federation, our curriculum encourages correlation amongst individual subjects within a ‘subject- centred’ framework. This design enables pupils to learn the skills and knowledge within individual subject disciplines, whilst also making connections, where applicable, across different domains. Individual subjects focus on the skills and powerful knowledge within each subject area, building on the prior knowledge and skills between year groups and key stages. Each subject discipline has its own timetabled space to ensure pupils are able to identify the specific subject focus. Planning the curriculum in this manner ensures that pupils are equipped with the key skills and knowledge required for their stage of education and are well prepared for the next phase. Pupils know which subjects they are studying and, through the emphasis on correlation, can make connections across a variety of contexts, consolidating the breadth of knowledge and skills across all areas of the curriculum.

We acknowledge that all curriculum designs have both advantages and disadvantages.

 

Subject-centred design benefits pupils because it is intently and intensely focused on the specific area of learning, providing a thorough and detailed view of the subject. Required learning can be clearly defined and pupils can be guided from beginning to end of a given aspect of the syllabus. Learning can be planned in advance to ensure that pupils face the appropriate progression of challenges to develop their learning. As this is a traditional approach to curriculum, pupils are familiar with the structure and feel comfortable with the delivery.

 

Commonly acknowledged disadvantages centre around the premise that learning is focused on knowledge of the subject at the expense of the needs of the learner and that it may limit broader thinking skills.

To combat these, the following strategies have been implemented to ensure that the curriculum remains creative and learner-centred, whilst promoting enquiry and curiosity.

  • Pupils are given an opportunity at the onset of every syllabus topic to input into the lines of enquiry to investigate. This supports a learner-centred approach whilst maintaining the specific subject skills and knowledge are taught.
  • Where appropriate, syllabus topics are posed as a question to encourage enquiry and curiosity. Pupils are expected to research new knowledge which will enable them to answer the question, whilst drawing on prior knowledge to make connections.
  • Creativity is encouraged through implementation strategies in the classroom and planned project-based learning.  

 

Communication, Language and Literacy:

We believe that Communication, Language and Literacy are fundamental in ensuring that children are equipped for everyday life. Therefore, these skills are taught in discrete lessons but also throughout all aspects of the curriculum.

Subject

Purpose

Journal

To develop fluency and accuracy of sentence structure and grammatical awareness.

Guided Reading

To develop reading fluency, comprehension skills and a love for reading. Children are exposed to material from a range of publishers and text types; we do not follow one prescribed scheme.

Phonics (KS1)

To develop a solid understanding of the different sounds which make up words, to be used as a reading strategy. The phonics scheme which we use is ‘Letters and Sounds’.

Literacy

To develop an awareness of different genres through reading, writing and speaking and listening activities.

Grammar/ Punctuation & Spelling (GPS)

To develop grammar, punctuation and spelling skills- taught discretely on Friday Literacy sessions (linked to genre/ literacy unity being taught)

 

Mathematics

At the Opossum Federation, we follow a ‘Teach for Mastery’ approach to embed the Mastery of Mathematics. We use supporting documents and overviews from ‘White Rose Maths’ for our medium-term planning and daily lesson design. The teaching of Mathematics is structured to promote the following:

  • Development of key skills to ensure that all pupils can recall and apply knowledge quickly and accurately, developing both procedural fluency and conceptual understanding.
  • Opportunities to solve problems across all areas of the curriculum
  • Opportunities for children to reason and communicate their mathematical ideas, both orally and in written form.

Our teaching of Mathematics aligns with the aims of the National Curriculum to ensure that all pupils:

  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of Mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately;
  • Reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language;
  • Can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions (NC, page 3)

 

The following diagram incorporates the 5 ‘big ideas’, drawn from research, that underpin teaching for mastery:

 

 

 

The Curriculum:

We believe that a relevant but experience broadening curriculum is essential in acquiring a passion for learning. We have therefore developed an inter-disciplinary curriculum, which allows children to develop links across all subjects. The syllabi for History or Geography are used to anchor the half term’s learning. It is essential that, whilst inter-disciplinary connections are made, key geographical and historical skills (see progression in History and Geography) are used to plan the learning journey.

 

Curriculum map: 2020-21

*this aligns with the renewal curriculum for 2020-21 

Year

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

1

 

What happens in Percy’s Park?

(S/ Literacy)

Who has helped to make the world a better place? (H)

Would you like to go for a holiday on the moon? (H- Neil Armstrong/ C. Columbus)

What will we see on our African Adventure?

(G)

Where will we go on the big red bus?

(G)

 

2

Where will we go on the big red bus?

(G)

How have people changed the world? (Black History)

(H) How have people changes the world? (Black History link)

 

Where in the World is Flat Stanley?

 (G)

Is there smoke without fire?

 (H)

*Time Detectives (H)

My local area- how has it changed through time? 

(H)

Where would you like to live?

 (G)

 

 

3

Where would you like to live?

 (G)

 

 

What have we learned from the Ancient Egyptians? (H)

 

Why does the earth rattle, rumble and roar?

Volcanoes and Earthquakes (G)

 

How ‘green’ are we?

Eco Warriors

 (G)

 

How does food end up on our plate? (G)

What’s the journey from Stone to Iron?

  (H)

 

4

What’s the journey from Stone to Iron?

  (H)

 

Why were the Romans so powerful?

 (H)

 

What did the Mayans do for us? (H)

 

How ‘fair’ is trade?

(G)

 

Explorers

(G)

Water, Water Everywhere

 (G)

 

5

Water, Water Everywhere

 (G)

Scandinavia  (G)

Our Living Planet- how sustainable are we? (G)

 

 

Who was the bravest, the boldest and the greatest? 

Vikings v’s Romans (H)

 

Would you rather be an Athenian or Spartan?

Ancient Greece (H)

What was the impact of the Victorians on Britain? (H)

 

6

 

What was the impact of the Victorians on Britain? (H)

 

What can we learn from Darwin?

Evolution

(S/G)

 

 

Where have you travelled?

Refugees

(G)

 

Time Travel

(G- Time zones)

 

Kingdoms, Law and Order- Anglo Saxon Britain

(H)

 

The Blitz- all we need to know about World War 2?

(H)

 

 

Curriculum Intent, Implementation and Impact:

Intent, implementation and impact underpin the curriculum and is reflected in the current Ofsted framework.

 

 

What is the intent of the Opossum Curriculum?

Why do we do what we do? Below is a table of some of the key features of the Opossum Curriculum and their intent: 

Aspects of Opossum’s Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

RE days

High levels of cultural diversity are present in the communities  which the federation serves, therefore an understanding of the different world religions is fundamental, to ensure that respectful communities are developed. A RE day per half term allows for deeper analysis and focus on each religion. Ensuring that opportunities for reflection are created supports pupils’ reflectivity.

These lessons also link with British values, in particular “mutual respect for and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and for those without faith”, as well as UNICEF Rights Respecting learning.

Learning weeks e.g.

Enterprise week

Weeks of learning with a particular focus, such as a project for Enterprise Week, are an opportunity for pupils to work intensively towards one outcome. They work on skills required in further education and employment: team work, creativity, determination, leadership, problem solving, planning and executing. It creates a real-world situation where pupils can apply these skills. Progression of these skills from EYFS to year 6 is planned for across the school.

Shakespeare Unit

To expose pupils from years 1 to 6 to the work of Britain’s (and arguably the world’s) greatest playwright. It intends to further develop their cultural awareness: of British and European history as well as the history of the English language and its development.

By participating in these units, pupils further develop their language skills, confidence and performing skills.

Half-termly educational visits

Physical visits will not be undertaken during the Autumn term – virtual visits undertaken where available (review for Spring term)

 

 

To develop experiential, hands-on, real-life experiences for pupils to put learning into context. As the federation has a high percentage of pupils who are recently arrived in the UK, many with EAL, providing hands-on / real-life experiences is essential for the contextualisation of learning and deeper understanding of the curriculum.

Travelling around London using public transport also develops pupils’ citizenship (e.g. etiquette when travelling).

Journal

A significant percentage of pupils enter our schools with low Language and Literacy starting points. Incorporating daily writing opportunities supports their development of the fundamentals of writing: punctuation, grammar and sentence structures which leads to fluency. These sessions also allow for creative freedom, where pupils are able to make choices in theme/genre.

Participation in competitions

Intra/Inter school competitions will not take place during the Autumn term. Where possible, competitive opportunities will be taken in class bubbles (review for Spring term)

To support the development of well-rounded pupils with positive attitudes to team-work, challenge and healthy competition. It creates opportunities for pupils to learn how to win gracefully, lose with dignity and take pride in effort when participating.

These events strengthen the bonds between local schools in Waltham Forest, and particularly between pupils in the Opossum federation.

Sharing Assemblies

In school assemblies will not be possible in the Autumn term, virtual opportunities will be explored (review for Spring term)

 

Sharing assemblies are an opportunity for parents to learn more about a particular aspect of their child’s learning, for example the teaching and learning of mathematics, or how mindfulness is used to create a happy classroom. During these visits, parents visit their child’s classroom to see the learning in action, strengthening the relationships between home and school. These are also an opportunity for pupils to show and celebrate their learning of the previous half term.

Showcase Assemblies

In school assemblies will not be possible in the Autumn term, virtual opportunities will be explored (review for Spring term)

Showcase assemblies provide a purpose to pupils’ learning and involve the parents in the celebration of their child’s learning around a particular topic, e.g. Black History Month.

Pupil leadership:

Prefects, Digital Ambassadors, RRSA Ambassadors, Lunch Ambassadors 

Pupil leadership supports the development of confidence, responsibility and leadership skills in pupils of all ages in the school. By being part of a leadership team, pupils experience the importance of planning, attending and minuting meetings, creating and implementing action plans and working towards a common goal (e.g. a Rights Respecting School or Eco School award). These pupil leadership groups ensure that pupils have a voice in aspects of school life that concerns them and that they have the power to influence actions and decisions. Election of candidates supports the British Value of democracy as pupils choose those who will represent them in these important roles.

Family events *dependent on seasonal/ whole school topic

(Ramble, craft, cooking, gardening)

Events will not be possible in the Autumn term (review for Spring term)

To develop community links, supporting families to cultivate a sense of belonging both within the school community and beyond. To promote partnership and community between staff and parents/ carers.

Seasonal events: Eid celebration, Carols by Candlelight, Winter Bazar,  Summer Fete, World Book Day

Physical events will not be possible in the Autumn term –wherever possible virtual alternatives will be provided  (review for Spring term)

To develop community links, supporting families to cultivate a sense of belonging both within the school community and beyond. To recognise a range of important cultural and religious events, promoting mutual respect and tolerance.

Change4Life groups

Groups will not be possible during the Autumn term (review for Spring term)

 

Based on NCMP data, high levels of overweight/ obesity are evident in the federation and across schools in Waltham Forest. Providing opportunities for pupils to engage in ‘Change 4 Life’ supports the development of pupils’ knowledge and understanding of healthy choices (physical activity and healthy eating).

Curriculum Breakfasts (Maths/Reading)

Physical events will not be possible in the Autumn term –wherever possible virtual alternatives will be provided  (review for Spring term)

To develop community links, supporting families to cultivate a sense of belonging both within the school community and beyond. To provide opportunities for families to spend time together and for staff to model and discuss key curriculum areas e.g. reading.

Study Breakfast

Groups will not be possible during the Autumn term (review for Spring term)

To aid transition from primary to secondary school by promoting independence, self-study and organisation. To provide opportunities for pupils to revise and consolidate key skills.

Y6 workshops: Virtual delivery

  • GAV
  • TfL
  • First Aid
  • Money Sense
  • Junior Citizens

To develop knowledge and understanding of key aspects which will impact their life ‘beyond school’. By raising knowledge and understanding, it will help pupils to make informed and safe choices outside of school. The various workshops act as transition units between primary and secondary school.

 

Online Learning Tools:

The federation has invested in a range of online resources to support learning in core subjects. The table below outlines resources which have been allocated to year groups.

Online Learning Tool

Year Groups

Admin

Bug Club

YR-Y6

Allocate books- weekly

Monitor use 

Accelerated Reader

Y4-Y6

Complete termly reading test to allocate reading level

Monitor reading of pupils

Monitor quizzes 

Times Tables Rockstars

Y2-Y6

Set challenges

Monitor and promote use

SATS Companion

Y6

Allocate weekly activities

Monitor use and gap analysis

Mathletics

YR-Y6

Allocate weekly tasks linked to key learning in Maths

Monitor use

 

Modern Foreign Language: French

Pupils in Y3-6 learn French as a Modern Foreign Language. The emphasis of these lessons is to develop vocabulary, begin to formulate sentences orally and in writing and deepen their understanding of the world.

 

D&T- Cooking:

Cooking will not be taught this academic year due to the implementation of the renewal curriculum and the need to reduce the amount of cross-contamination by limiting resource sharing. Please note that for pupils in Y2-Y6, they have had above the curriculum time for DT Cooking in previous years. The focus of the D&T for this year will relate to the ‘design, evaluate and technical knowledge’ strands of  the curriculum.

 

Creative: Art/ Music/ Computing:

For the 2020-21 academic year, a renewal curriculum has been implemented to ensure all pupils ‘catch-up’ due to school closures last academic year. Time is allocated within each class timetable to allow for the delivery of these subjects. Restrictions, in line with the approved risk assessment, currently limit the implementation of some aspects of the syllabi e.g. singing.

 

Music: Music Express Scheme of Work

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 1

Sounds interesting: Exploring Sounds

The long and short of it: Exploring duration

Feel the pulse: Exploring Pulse and rhythm

Taking off: Exploring pitch

What’s the score? Exploring instruments and symbols

Rain rain go away: Exploring timbre, tempo and dynamics

Year 2

The long and short of it: Exploring duration

Feel the pulse: Exploring Pulse and rhythm

Taking off: Exploring pitch

What’s the score? Exploring instruments and symbols

Rain rain go away: Exploring timbre, tempo and dynamics

Sounds interesting: Exploring Sounds

Year 3

Animal Magic: Exploring descriptive sounds

Play it again: Exploring rhythmic patterns

The class orchestra: exploring arrangements

Dragon scales: exploring pentatonic scales

Painting with sound: Exploring sound colours

Salt, pepper, vinegar, mustard: exploring singing games

Year 4

Play it again: exploring rhythmic patterns

The class orchestra: exploring arrangements

Dragon scales: exploring melodies and scales

Painting with sound: Exploring sound colours

Salt, pepper, vinegar, mustard: exploring singing games

Animal Magic: Exploring descriptive sounds

Year 5

Cyclic patterns: Exploring rhythm and pulse

Roundabout: Exploring rounds

Journey into space: exploring sound sources

Songwriter: Exploring lyrics and melody

Stars, hide your fires: performing together

Who Knows? Exploring music processes

Year 6

Roundabout: Exploring rounds

Journey into space: exploring sound sources

Songwriter: Exploring lyrics and melody

Cyclic patterns: Exploring rhythm and pulse

Stars, hide your fires: performing together

Who Knows? Exploring music processes

 

 

Art: Suffolk Scheme of work

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Drawing

Painting

Printmaking

Collage

Textiles

3D

 

Teaching of Religious Education:

RE is taught using the syllabus set by Waltham Forest. Lessons are taught in blocks every half term, rather than in weekly sessions. One day per half term has been set as an ‘RE day’ where the syllabus for the half term is taught in one day. The curriculum has been arranged in themes, rather than separate religions, allowing pupils to understand a particular religious strand across the five main world religions. The table below sets the half termly themes, the Waltham Forest syllabus (saved on Public/T drive) should be used to plan progression and outcomes across the year groups.

Link to Waltham Forest’s RE syllabus:

https://www.walthamforest.gov.uk/sites/default/files/KS1%262%20Final%20Syllabus%202016.pdf

 

Parents have the right to withdraw their children from the teaching of RE. If they wish to do so, they must put their reasons in writing, addressed to the Head of School.

 

RE at Opossum – half termly overview

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

 

Spring 2

 

Summer 1

 

Summer 2

 

Whole school theme

Places of worship

Festivals

Important stories in religion

A day in the life...

RE through art

(symbols)

Values through religion

Year 1

Christianity

Christianity

(Christmas - Nativity)

Christianity

(The good Samaritan)

Christianity

Easter story

Islam

Islam

Year 2

Islam

Christianity

 

Baptisms & naming

Christianity, Islam & Buddhism (The story of creation)

Islam

Christianity

Symbols of Easter

Christianity

Year 3

Sikhism

Hinduism

(Diwali)

 

Christianity & Islam

Buddhism

Sikhism

Hinduism

Year 4

Hinduism

Islam

(Eid-ul-Fitr  after Ramadan)

Buddhism & Christianity

Judaism

Hinduism

Sikhism

Year 5

Christianity (cathedrals & churches)

Judaism

(Hanukah)

Hinduism & Islam

Sikhism

Buddhism

Sikhism & Islam

Year 6

Judaism

Islam

(Eid-ul-Adha story of sacrifice)

Sikhism & Islam

Hinduism

Islam

Buddhism & Christianity

 

EYFS

 

RE & celebrations

Eid (depends on when Eid occurs that year)

 

Harvest

Diwali (story of Rama & Sita)

 

Bonfire night

 

Christmas

Chinese New Year

Mother’s Day

 

Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day)

 

Easter

Recap on the different religions and cultures

Father’s Day

 

Ramadan (will change depending on the year)

 

 

Annual RE trips, year group *postponed for the Autumn term, review for spring

 

 

Trip

Religious link

Year 1

Local church

Christianity

Year 2

Local mosque

Islam

Year 3

Gurdwara

Sikhism

Year 4

Hindu temple

Hinduism

Year 5

St Paul’s

Christianity

Year 6

Jewish Museum

 

Judaism

 

PSHE and Relationships and Health Education (RHE)

Relationships and Health Education (RHE) is a statutory part of the National Curriculum from September 2020. It forms part of the overall PSHE curriculum which is taught at the Opossum Federation. The RHE and PSHE curriculum aims to:

  • Provide opportunities and experiences which reflects pupils’ increasing independence and physical and social awareness
  • Provides teaching and learning opportunities which provide the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships including:
    • Families and people who care for me
    • Caring friendships
    • Respectful relationships
    • Online Relationships
    • Being Safe
  • Provides teaching and learning opportunities which give pupils the tools they need to be healthy citizens, including:
    • Mental and physical well-being
    • Healthy eating
    • Drugs, alcohol and tobacco
    • Basic First Aid
    • Changing adolescent body (as part of the Science statutory curriculum)
  • Provide strategies for pupils to become effective citizens in their wider communities

RHE and PSHE Programme of Study

The National curriculum statements (aims and objectives for the RHE curriculum), alongside the Programme of Study for PSHE (PSHE Association) have been broken down into individual year groups, aligned with specific subject domains. The curriculum, as designed by the Opossum Federation, has been aligned with the National Curriculum statements. The curriculum is set into six half-termly themes as follows:

  • Autumn 1: Health and wellbeing: Physical and Mental Health
  • Autumn 2: Health and wellbeing: Keeping Safe
  • Spring 1: Relationships: Family and Friendships
  • Spring 2: Relationships: Respectful and Safe Relationships
  • Summer 1: Living in the Wider World: Financial Literacy
  • Summer 2: Health and wellbeing: Ourselves- Growing and Changing

Key skills and knowledge within each of the themes have been mapped out across year groups (from Year 1-6), enabling pupils to build upon previous skills and knowledge. This is outlined in the Programme of study which is found in the PSHE guidance. 

 

Health Education and Science Curriculum (Health and well-being day): scheduled for Y5 and 6 in the summer term where they will cover the science element of puberty

 

  • To identify the external genitalia and internal reproductive organs in males and females and how the process of puberty relates to human reproduction
  • To understand the physical and emotional changes that happen when approaching and during puberty (including menstruation, erections and wet dreams)
  • To understand how hygiene routines change during the time of puberty, the importance of keeping clean and how to maintain personal hygiene
  • To know where to get more information, help and advice about growing and changing, especially about puberty
 

Teaching and learning:

The RHE and PSHE curriculum has been timetabled weekly for pupils across Year 1-6 Each of the half- termly themes will be taught in half-termly blocks, as per the programme of study.

 

Pupils in Year 5 and 6 will be taught about the changing adolescent body, as part of the Science and Health (RHE) curriculum, in a ‘Health and wellbeing day’ during the summer term. The content for these lessons, as prescribed by both the Science National Curriculum for Key Stage 1 and 2 and the RSE Statutory Guidance, are as below and will be taught across Years 5 and 6:

 

Science Curriculum

Health Education (as per Relationship and Health Education)

Year 5: Animals Including Humans- describe the changes as humans develop to old age (Science programme of study for Key stage 1 and 2- page 27)

Pupils will learn about the changes experienced in puberty

Health Education: Changing Adolescent Body (RSE Statutory guidance, page 33)

Pupils should know:

  • key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.
  • about menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

 

 

Resources:

Resources which are used in the teaching of RHE and PSHE are as follows:

  • A selection of high-quality children’s picture books which help to teach the half-termly themes
  • 1-Decision Resources
  • Teaching resources as developed by member of the Opossum SLT and MLT.
 

Curriculum Events 2020-21:

Curriculum events will be limited this year due to restrictions linked to ongoing COVID-19 risk assessments. Learning in class, along with a classroom display, will mark the events as outline below. These can be shared with the wider school community via photographs of learning in the weekly bulletins/ website. No sharing assemblies will take place to mark the events. 

 

Autumn:

Rights Respecting / Opossum Core Values

Class charters and striving for excellence

  • Pupils will commence the year developing their understanding of rights and respect and how to achieve excellence. They will think about their long-term goals and develop a passport to success.
  • Each class to complete a project on one of the rights contained within the UNCRC.

 

October: Black History Month

  • Fortnight of 12th- 23rd October
  • Pupils learn about a chosen person/ event important to black history in journal/ guided reading sessions.
  • October assemblies will focus on people who made a difference

 

Anti-Bullying Week

The following aspect of the PSHE (Relationships: managing hurtful behaviour and bullying) will be addressed through the annual anti-bullying week, using the annual national topic/ theme. The following are the objectives, which should be covered.

Learning should be covered through Journal/ Guided Reading/ Creative and History or Geography timetables slots- therefore, you will not be teaching Geography/ History for this week. 

 

 

Year1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

PSHE: Bullying

Know what is kind and unkind behaviour, and how this can affect others

 

Know how people may feel if they experience hurtful behaviour or bullying

Know that hurtful behaviour (offline and online) is not acceptable; how to report bullying; the importance of telling a trusted adult

 

To understand the impact of bullying, including offline and online, and the consequences of hurtful behaviour

 

To develop strategies to respond to hurtful behaviour experienced or witnessed, offline and online (including teasing, name-calling, or physical bullying); how to report concerns and get support

 

To develop strategies to respond to hurtful behaviour experienced or witnessed, offline and online (trolling, harassment or the deliberate excluding of others); how to report concerns and get support

 

To understand discrimination: what it means and how to challenge it

 

Summer:

Shakespeare unit

At the Opossum Federation, we recognise the importance of using Shakespeare’s plays to enhance the teaching and learning of English.

The children have responded extremely well to these ‘Shakespeare Units’ in the past and have produced fantastic outcomes including:

  • Comic strips
  • Play scripts
  • Performed plays or sections of Shakespeare’s plays
  • Narratives
  • Letters
  • Newspaper articles
  • Diary entries
  • Poem

Year groups

Plays

Year 1

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Year 2

Tempest

Year 3

Romeo and Juliet

Year 4

Twelfth Night

Year 5

Hamlet

Year 6

Macbeth

 

Career Day

The following aspect of the PSHE (Economic wellbeing: Aspirations, Work and Careers) will be addressed through a careers’ day. The following are the objectives, which should be covered.

 

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Economic wellbeing: Aspirations, Work and Careers

To understand that everyone has different strengths

To understand that jobs help people to earn money to pay for things

 

To understand that some of the strengths and interests someone might need to do different jobs

To understand that different jobs that people they know or people who work in the community do

 

To identify the kind of job that they might like to do when they are older

To recognise positive things about themselves and their achievements

To relate personal skills and achievements to possible careers

 

To identify the kind of job that they might like to do when they are older

To understand that there is a broad range of different jobs/careers that people can have; that people often have more than one career/type of job during their life

To understand what might influence people’s decisions about a job/ career

 

To identify the kind of job that they might like to do when they are older

To know some of the skills that will help them in their future careers e.g. teamwork, communication and negotiation

To understand stereotypes in the workplace and that a person’s career aspirations should not be limited by them

 

To identify the kind of job that they might like to do when they are older

To recognise a variety of routes into careers (e.g. college, apprenticeship, university)

To know some of the skills that will help them in their future careers e.g. teamwork, communication and negotiation

 

 

Top